Here, as requested, are the bullet points from Charles Christian’s presentation earlier today at the Janders Dean Knowledge Management Conference in Sydney. (Sorry, no more Mars Bars to give away.) The event runs through until Friday and you can follow it on Twitter at #JDKMconf

• Innovation in Knowledge Management & the Role of Technology – or why have so many law firms spent millions of dollars over the past 15 years building unsatisfactory, lacklustre KM systems?

• The quick answer is the Wrong People have been using the Wrong Technology to curate the Wrong Content

• A Brief History of KM Technology – from Big Software & Search Engines to Taxonomies, Legal Thesauri, PSL professional support lawyers, Consultants and Mars Bars

• For too long KM has been the preserve of self-appointed KM professionals – and the baleful influence of legal publishers

• Real lawyers don’t use law – they use document templates & precedents – but what really differentiates law firms is their Business Best Practices & Workflows + Commercial Intelligence

• There is more relevant KM information captured in law firm time recording, credit control and CRM systems than in most KM systems: How long did the project take? What resources were required? Did we make a profit on the matter?

• In the Brave New World of the Leaner, Meaner Legal Fee Earning Machine legal services is no longer about the academic practice of law

• Legal expertise is assumed but in the New Normal, this is irrelevant if legal services cannot be delivered profitability OR in a fashion that meets the business and commercial drivers of the client

Four Disruptive Technologies

– Law firms need to reinvent the workplace – move to a friendlier, sharing physical working environment rather than the traditional, hierarchical, bureaucratic office environment. Closed office doors are only for meetings – the rest of the office (as subsequent speakers from Freehills explained) needs to be more like a Starbucks

– Law firms need to reinvent the interface – the most widely used computer software application today is not Microsoft Outlook but Facebook – KM systems need to have more in common with social media software than library index systems

– The iTunesification of legal information – legal information and KM needs to be accessible in relevant bite-sized chunks. Users no longer want to buy the album – they want to cherry-pick the best tracks. Potentially huge threat to traditional legal publishers’ business models.

– The Gamification of KM, legal training and legal software applications – too many training systems are dull, they need to be more fun to use, have more in common with FourSquare than a teaching aid

• And also all this needs to be deliverable upon an iPad