• First off congratulations to Ladies in Legal Information (LILI) which last week held its first successful networking event attended by some of the industry’s most influential female figures. Held at the Corinthia Hotel in London on 22 June, the event Climbing the management ladder featured keynote talks from finance directors and global business development directors at leading law firms. Attendees also had the opportunity to ask the panel questions and network with peers from across the industry.  

Janet Day, chair of the event said “When you hear someone who is successful say I now wish I had had a mentor to whom I could turn to make my career path more direct you know that LILI is the right organisation at the right time – pointing to support for the right people. Our event was a runaway success because it tapped into needs which nothing in the market is as yet addressing properly.

“Our aim is to develop a programme of events which gives women the opportunity to discuss topical issues in legal information as well as encouraging women to develop careers in technology and information without feeling intimidated. The success and feedback from this first event has been overwhelmingly positive and reinforces our aim to provide quality networking events for women in the industry. We always welcome new members and look forward to seeing some new faces at our next event later this year.”

• Secondly, ever thought of moving into the Russian market, well here is a little video link (dug out by one of the Orange elves) that tells you everything you need to know…




• Finally, for those of you with an iPad 2 you may (or may not) be interested in this new cover: the Aranez iPad 2 Notebook Kangaroo Leather Case made of high-grade genuine Australian kangaroo leather. What's so special, we hear you ask, about kangaroo leather or K-Leather, as it is sometimes referred to? Apparently – and here we quote… “the fiber structure of kangaroo leather is the strongest of any readily available leather. Recent studies have suggested links between the kangaroo fiber matrix and that of birds and reptiles. It's almost a prehistoric fiber structure, one that evolved from animals that needed to survive in the harshest environments against multiple predators. Put it this way: If it can help protect the kangaroo from Australia's unforgiving environment, it is ideally suited to shielding tablets and smart phones from the slings and arrows of modern life.”

For those concerned about the welfare of the 'roos, Aranez say the kangaroos are not killed for leather. To the contrary, the K-Leather used in the Aranez cases is a byproduct of 'strategic harvesting' instituted by the Australian government to help control the kangaroo population in Australia, particularly in the states of Queensland, New South Wales, Western Australia and South Australia. The eradication of the kangaroo's natural predators, combined with the hardy marsupial's prodigious reproductive abilities, have resulted in a chronic overpopulation problem that, according to the Aussie government, threatens numerous other species as well as the ecosystem. The management programs control the populations while ensuring the sustainability of the common kangaroo species as a renewable resource. Says Ararnez “The skins are a byproduct in the same sense that cowhide leather is a byproduct of the meat industry.” So that's OK then.